Past Projects

Receiving public input regarding the use of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds is very important to both the City and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the resource for the City's CDBG dollars. In order to help get the creative processes flowing, this page will provide a sampling of activities funded in prior years. Having funded an activity in the past, however, is no guarantee that a similar project would be funded again, as priorities change from year to year.

The City feels it is important, also, to make the community aware of improvements brought about through the CDBG program that would not or might not have been possible otherwise. As an entitlement community since the beginning of the CDBG program in 1974, the City of Aurora has received over $26 million to help meet the City's redevelopment goals. Currently the City receives approximately $1.3 million each year through the CDBG program.


Housing Rehabilitation


Since the beginning of the City's involvement as an entitlement community in the CDBG program, assisting lower income residents make necessary repairs to their homes was a priority. While the full housing rehabilitation assistance has undergone some significant changes over the years, the Paint Rebate and the Energy Rebate Programs have changed very little. Through these programs, homeowners can receive rebates-as much as $7,000 for total housing rehab-to offset the cost of making improvements.

Additional Benefits For Seniors & Disabled Residents


Special assistance programs for seniors and/or persons with disabilities were implemented several years ago. These include: grants up to $1,000 per qualifying household to add security features to their homes, such as installing smoke detectors, deadbolt locks, or security lighting; and grants to cover their cost of replacing deteriorated parkway sidewalks, curbs and drive approaches.

Neighborhood Improvements


CDBG funds have been used to purchase and/or install playground equipment in low - to moderate-income neighborhoods. These have been located on school property, public housing communities, and neighborhood tot-lots.

Home Ownership Opportunities


Fox Valley Habitat for Humanity has received funds to acquire lots for new construction. These homes are built through volunteer efforts including the future homeowner's contribution of volunteer time. As in this photo, the homes can be customized to accommodate special needs.

Community Enhancements


Four of the community's museums have received financial assistance through the program to stabilize the structure or to make accessibility modifications. Without the CDBG dollars Aurora residents could have been deprived of the benefit these museums offer and may have been deprived of the architectural beauty of them, as well. Consider the impact of not having the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) War Memorial, the SciTech Museum, the Aurora Regional Fire Museum, or the Tanner House Museum. If you have never visited any one of these, now is the time to see what you've been missing.

Public Service Agency Support


Support for public service agencies is done in two ways: financial assistance for program delivery or financial assistance for capital improvements. Each year approximately $200,000 is available for various public service programs from tutorial programs to emergency assistance for seniors.

Sometimes agencies find themselves outgrowing their facilities or needing repairs to their facilities in order to maintain quality service. CDBG funds have been able to support these activities over the many years. For some, CDBG dollars made the difference between being able to open their doors or not. Excellent examples to go see include Two Rivers Head Start Family Center at the corner of Jackson and East Benton, Rachel's Place Adult Day Care Center (located in the former chapel area behind Fox River Pavilion on East New York Street), and check out the addition to Marie Wilkinson Child Development Center.